In search of the elusive Elegant Trogon – Chiricahua Mountains, AZ

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We are dedicating this post to Bob Gauvreau, a dear friend of ours who passed away recently.  We’ve enjoyed many good times with Bob and Dee Dee over the past few years. They prompted us to camp at Rusty’s RV Ranch, one of their favorite campgrounds where we stayed during this unexpected search for the elusive Elegant Trogon.

When you’re searching for an elusive bird and not finding it, there can be some frustration.  But when you’re in a place that’s known to harbor that bird the anticipation is heightened.  And that’s what happened as we checked in at Rusty’s RV Ranch and Rusty handed me a map of things to do and see in the area.  My ears really perked up when she said the Elegant Trogon had recently been spotted just down the road at the Chiricahua Mountains! Continue reading

A slice of Old Historic Route 66 – Tucumcari, New Mexico

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With Bernalillo in our rearview mirror, we were now officially eastbound on I-40.  True to our desire to not drive more than 200 miles per segment and stay at least two days at each stop, we set eyes on the little town of Tucumcari as our final stop in New Mexico. Continue reading

Friends, rock teepees and a singing road – Bernalillo, NM

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We were excited to move 157 miles south from Farmington to Bernalillo, where the “two B’s” would be neighbors – the two B’s were our coach Betsy and our good friends’ home on wheels named Beluga.  Yes, we were very happy that Dave and Sue could arrange their schedule so we could meet up as we intersected briefly in New Mexico. Continue reading

Ruins, Rocks and fantastical hoodoos – Farmington, NM

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Our trek south and east is well underway, and as you read this we’re already sitting in Alabama!  Yup, we’re moving along faster than usual, but doing lots of fun things as we also dodge some severe weather along the way.  The fast pace and juggling of our stops has put a bit of a cramp in my blogging efforts, but I’m trying to avoid falling too far behind 🙂 Continue reading

Healing and fun continue in New Mexico

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Note: Once again I’m slacking off on my blogging, but I have good reasons.  We just got back from a wonderful trip to central Europe, and now we’re on our way to Tucson for Steve’s follow-up appointments.  I have a lot of writing to catch up on, as well as reading the current status of fellow bloggers.

For now, let me take you back two months to our time in New Mexico where Steve continued his recovery.  After a post-treatment follow-up with his oncologist, we were OK’d to finally get out of overheated Tucson.  Steve wasn’t yet in top shape to drive Betsy, but we just had to move on. The city life with blaring sirens, traffic, train horns, dust, and impossible heat was getting old.  We had to hit the road! Continue reading

Out and about in Santa Fe and Las Vegas, NM

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Loretto Chapel

The northernmost point of the Turquoise Trail officially ends at the junction of State Highway 14 and Interstate 25, just south of Santa Fe.  We set up camp at Santa Fe Skies RV Park (Steve’s review here), which offered spacious sites and panoramic views of four mountain ranges.  The park was recommended by our friends Ayn and Chuck, who are now part-time residents of Santa Fe and part-time travelers.  Our little reunion with them was our main reason for stopping, and we had a couple of excellent meals together. Continue reading

Discovering the Turquoise Trail National Scenic Byway, NM

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We left the Alien-infested town of Roswell and continued our human trek northward, stopping at Cedar Crest, NM.  We had planned this stop close to Albuquerque so we could catch up on some mundane tasks such as haircuts and a grocery stock-up at Costco.  But we also had an issue with Betsy’s furnace and a recall on our Honda that had to be dealt with. Finally, I needed some time to catch up on my blogging chores, since our stop at Big Bend was so active that we hardly had a minute to sit down there.

Steve Lowe

The handyman at work on the furnace

In between all of the chores (we can’t remain still for long), we were able to explore the Turquoise Trail National Scenic Byway on Highway 14.  Our home base at the Turquoise Trail RV Park (Steve’s review here) was right at the south end of the Byway.

This Scenic Byway lies in the heart of central New Mexico, linking Albuquerque and Santa Fe.  We checked out the entire 50-mile-long trail along Highway 14 from Tijeras to Santa Fe. Along the way, we passed through the historic mining town of Cerillos and the cool little artsy town of Madrid.

Turquoise Trail

Turquoise Trail National Scenic Byway

Quirky shops and restaurants lined the streets of Madrid, enticing us to come back for an excellent lunch (great suggestion, Hans!) and a better look around town when we moved Betsy up to Santa Fe a few days later.

Turquoise Trail National Scenic Byway

Madrid, New Mexico

The Hollar

Stopped at the Hollar for lunch

We continued on to Cerillos, where the mining district is one of the oldest and most marked of the Old Spanish mineral developments in the Southwest.  We stopped here for some exercise and checked out the Jane Calvin Sanchez hiking trail at Cerillos State Park.

Following the trail for over two miles, we climbed several steep grades that really got our hearts pumping.  Old mining operations were quite evident as we passed several abandoned mine shafts displaying interpretive plaques.  We learned a bit of mining history while taking in some beautiful views of the endless New Mexico sky and surrounding mountains.

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The old mine shafts are fenced off to keep people and critters from falling in

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Plaques showed the history of mining here and facts about each hand-dug shaft

Cerillos State Park

We really are in the wild, wild west!

On another day we drove up to Sandia Peak, the highest in the Sandia Mountains. Towering at 10,678 ft., it dominates Albuquerque’s eastern skyline and from there we had panoramic views of Albuquerque and the Rio Grande Valley.  Right at the top we saw a “Steel Forest”, a major communications complex for the southwest since 1945.

Steel Forest of Sandia Crest Electronic Site

Sandia Crest’s Steel Forest communications site

Standing atop Sandia Crest, we were a mile above Albuquerque and two miles above sea level.  It was a clear day during our visit, allowing awesome views in every direction.

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The city of Albuquerque and the Rio Grande lay before us

Sandai Mountains

Granite crags on the west side of the Sandia Mountains

Sandia Crest

Frequent and fierce winds up here cause “flagging” of the fir trees

While returning from a walk along the crest, we found some northward-facing spots still covered with snow, so of course I took advantage of a photo-op!

Sandia Crest

Springtime is the windy season here in New Mexico, and every big gust of wind brings clouds of dust with it.  That caused us to suffer with runny noses and watery eyes (not to mention a dusty car and RV) for a couple of weeks.  When the wind calmed down I took a break from my computer work and ventured around the RV park to see some of the flowering trees showing their buds (the park manager told us that spring begins on May 1st here).

Cedar Waxwing

This Cedar Waxwing enjoyed the flowering Apple Crabtree

House Finch

Who wouldn’t love watching a couple of Finches kissing?

And this cute Prairie Dog appeared from his dugout to say hello to me!

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I hustled back to Betsy as the wind started blowing again.  As we were to soon find out, there was plenty more wind and dust waiting for us at Santa Fe.

 

Next Up:  Venturing along the Santa Fe Trail



 

Our close encounter of the third kind – Roswell, NM

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In ufology, a close encounter is an event in which a person witnesses and/or interacts with an unidentified flying object.  A system of event classifications was introduced by an astronomer and UFO researcher, J. Allen Hynek.  According to him , Close Encounters of the First Kind refers to visual sightings of an unidentified flying object seemingly less than 500 feet away.  A Close Encounter of the Second Kind is a UFO event in which a physical effect is alleged, such as animals reacting or physical trace-like impressions on the ground. Close Encounters of the Third Kind refers to encounters in which one or more animated aliens are present, as was reported in the 1947 Roswell incident.  We learned these classifications, along with some other interesting factoids during our visit to the UFO Museum in Roswell .

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Yep, we’re getting close to our destination!

When most people hear a reference to Roswell, they’re reminded of the 1947 UFO incident.  Since we weren’t around at that time, we relied on the information we read at the museum.  The story of the Roswell Incident has been painstakingly documented, as has information about aspects of other UFO phenomena, crop circles, UFO sightings and Nevada’s Area 51.  Only those who are “believers” or are really interested in this subject will spend the many hours required to read all of the museum’s displays and exhibits. There was so much material that we basically skimmed through what most interested us, then we watched the showtime movie “Roswell” at the museum’s theater.

UFO Museum

Kind of a creepy exhibit

After a couple of hours reading about witness stories and government cover-ups, we drove around town.  We quickly noticed these folks really play up the UFO thing – many of the store facades were alien-themed.

Roswell, New Mexico

Even some of the local landowners get into the act!

Looks like someone is trying to phone home…

Roswell, NM

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Roswell has other museums that are not about UFO’s or Aliens.  Our blogger friends Hans and Lisa of Metamorphosis Road, who were only a few days behind us, visited several other museums in town.  Check out their site to see what fascinating things they discovered during their stay.

Lee, the owner of the Red Barn RV Park (Steve’s review here), gave us a list of things to do while in town.  One of her suggestions that I followed was a trip to the Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge to see if any migratory birds might be hanging around.

Bitter Lake NWR

I had my priorities straight, and went to visit some of my feathered friends.  Steve tagged along so he could walk some of the four trails there, and we ended up following the easy 2-mile Oxbow Trail.  We didn’t see any birds close-up on that walk, but we spotted a few during the 8-mile wildlife drive within the refuge.

The Bitter Lake NWR was only about 12 miles from our home base and consisted of over 24,000 acres in three units along the Pecos River.

Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge

Bird Blind in the middle of the lake – well, it was a lake at one time

Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge

The ever-diligent bird spy

Bitter Lake NWR

I went inside the bird blind, but they all flew away when they heard me

After our walk we continued on the driving tour and stopped at a few overlooks.  We finally saw some White Pelicans and a variety of ducks in the distance.  The park ranger informed us that fall and late winter are the best times to see Sandhill Cranes, ducks and geese.

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American Avocet

First time I’ve seen an American Avocet

If you happen to be in the Roswell area in September, be aware that the 14th Annual Dragonfly Festival at the Refuge will be held then.  The refuge boasts having the most diverse population of dragonflies and damselflies in North America, and they will be there in great numbers by fall.  Access to the refuge is free, so you can visit as many times as you like.

After three nights in UFO land, we packed up and resumed our northward trek.

 

Next up:  Venturing off  of the Turquoise Trail National Scenic Byway